5 articles


Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ Lands at A24 (Exclusive)

20 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A24 has bought U.S. distribution rights to Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project,” Variety has learned.

The movie about a homeless family in the Sunshine State premiered at the Cannes Film Festival Directors’ Fortnight. Oscar nominee Willem Dafoe (“Platoon”) stars alongside Caleb Landry Jones (“X-Men: First Class”), and newcomers Brooklynn Prince and Bria Vinaite. Baker co-wrote the picture with Chris Bergoch.

Related

Jane Campion on Lack of Female Filmmakers, ‘Top of the Lake: China Girl’

The film enjoyed strong reviews, which sparked interest from multiple bidders. Amazon Studios, Neon, and Annapurna circled the project this week, but some players dropped out after bidding on the micro-indie passed $1 million.

In a favorable notice, Variety’s Owen Gleiberman wrote that Baker’s “follow-up to ‘Tangerine’ is another vibrant tale of the American lower depths, this one rooted in the magic and heartbreak of childhood.”

Baker’s last film, “Tangerine,” was »


- Ramin Setoodeh and Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Cohen Media Closing In On Michel Hazanavicius’ Godard Film ‘Redoubtable:’ Cannes

22 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Update: That didn’t take long. Cohen Media Group has closed the deal on Redoubtable. I’m attaching the whole press release on the bottom of this morning’s break.

Exclusive, 6:32 AM PST: The Cannes distribution deals are still coming. I hear that Cohen Media Group is nearing a domestic distribution deal for Redoubtable. That’s the Cannes premiere film by The Artist helmer Michel Hazanavicius-directed drama that stars Louis Garrel, Stacy Martin, and Berenice Bejo. Florence… »


Permalink | Report a problem


Crying Seagull Tears Above the Croisette: Sam Kuhn’s Cannes Diary, Part Six

1 hour ago | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Director, screenwriter and boatbuilder (!) Sam Kuhn is in Cannes premiering his short film, Möbius — described as “a moth-eaten tale of magic and mutation half remembered by a teen poet who’s beloved lies lifeless in a stream” — in Critic’s Week. Filmmaker asked Kuhn, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, to keep a diary of his experiences, which rapidly went from jet-lagged to deeply strange. Here is his sixth entry; click here for them all. Day 8 Eight and it’s full circle, which seems fitting as “8” is a basic Möbius-like shape. Woke and walked immediately to the “morning […] »

- Sam Kuhn

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2017. Josh & Benny Safdie's “Good Time”

3 hours ago | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Leaping straight from the American independent scene into the (ostensible) prestige of Cannes with Good Time, Josh and Benny Safdie deliver one of the best films in competition. Following up the superb junkie drama Heaven Knows What (2014), the New York directors rewrite a familiar crime drama with their distinctive voices, creating a story that's at once gripping, formally thrilling and cannily aware of its social context. It may be too soon to say whether the Safdies will become Cannes perennials; but at this moment, they provide the official selection with a welcome dose of adrenaline.Following an opening that sees Constantine “Connie” Nikas (Robert Pattinson) pull his mentally handicapped brother Nick (Benny Safdie) from a therapist interview (of sorts), Good Time wastes no time in getting going. After a bank robbery gone wrong, during which Nick gets taken by the cops, the camera sticks almost exclusively to Connie, tracing his »

Permalink | Report a problem


A Common Fabric: Nikolaus Geyrhalter's "Over the Years"

11 hours ago | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Nikoclaus Geyrhalter's Over the Years (2015), which is receiving an exclusive global online premiere on Mubi, is showing from May 26 - June 25, 2017 as a Special Discovery.In the modern cinema, one cliché that has developed is the notion that “everyone is connected.” A kind of bastardized version of Marxist or Weberian social theory, this is a film structure that often observes a host of seemingly disparate individuals across the majority of the movie’s running time, only to bring them together at the end, supposedly at random, with some sort of cataclysmic event. It could be a car crash, a sinking ship, a bank robbery, or some natural disaster, but the point is clear: no one in the film was put there by chance. The “random” end was preordained, and everything before it has been working up unavoidably to that conclusive moment. The less said about these sorts of films, the better. »

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Stranger Things’ to ‘Anne With an E’: The Secret Weapon Behind Netflix’s Latest Stunning Opening Sequence

11 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Stranger Things” and “Anne with an E” wouldn’t appear to have much in common. But both Netflix series boast iconic and impactful opening sequences created by the same design studio.

Imaginary Forces creative director Alan Williams, whose company earned lauds for its minimalist title design for “Stranger Things,” reached out to Netflix again when he learned that the streaming service was adapting the novel into a series, “Anne with an E.” Like many, Williams grew up captivated by Anne Shirley, the heroine from author Lucy Maud Montgomery’s book “Anne of Green Gables. The lonely orphan had an indomitable spirit, wild imagination, and affinity for the natural world that she brought with her to Green Gables, where she finally found a home.

Read More: ‘Anne With an E’ Review: A ‘Breaking Bad’ Producer Adaptation of ‘Anne of Green Gables’ Dares to Darken Its Cheery Outlook

“One huge thing for »


- Hanh Nguyen

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Bloodline’ Review: Final Season Struggles to Find Meaning in a Confounding, Non-Committal Finale — Spoilers

11 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

For those curious if the final season of “Bloodline” is worth it — the basest function of a review — I will quickly and succinctly answer: No.

Such efficiency feels refreshing after 10 redundant and listless hours spent with a family stuck in the Florida swamp, drifting through the guilty consciouses of characters who seem eager to move on from their own story, and the only thing holding them back is the need to fill one more season.

At its best, “Bloodline” found tension in the intense moral quandaries drawn out by its central conflict: John Rayburn (Kyle Chandler), the patriarch of the Rayburn family, and his younger brother, Danny (Ben Mendelsohn), couldn’t resolve deep-seeded issues that divided them years before “Bloodline” began; not before it was too late, Danny was dead, and John was the one holding him under water.

Read More: ‘Bloodline’ Recap Video: Relive Every Essential Moment of the »


- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


5 articles

  « Prev | Next »

IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners