Movie News

‘Han Solo’ Directors Chris Miller and Phil Lord Reveal Departure Reason: ‘Our Approach Was Really Different’

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‘Han Solo’ Directors Chris Miller and Phil Lord Reveal Departure Reason: ‘Our Approach Was Really Different’
It’s never easy to get let go from a project, but in their first public appearance since exiting what’s now been titled “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” Phil Lord and Chris Miller handled it gracefully.

“The experience of shooting the movie was wonderful,” Lord said to the crowd at Vulture Festival Sunday. “In terms of us leaving the project, everyone went in with really good intentions and our approach was really different from theirs… The gap was too big.”

Added Lord, “Sometimes people break up and it’s sad. We learned a lot from our collaborators, we’re really proud of our work and wish everyone with the best.”
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'Justice League' Stumbles in Domestic Debut as 'Wonder' Delivers Wondrous Results

'Justice League' Stumbles in Domestic Debut as 'Wonder' Delivers Wondrous Results
Warner Bros. and DC Comics' Justice League struggled compared to expectations as it failed to top $100 million over the course of its three-day weekend. Meanwhile, it was Lionsgate's Wonder that captured audience attention, debuting with an excellent $27 million, topping Thor: Ragnarok for a second place finish, positioning itself well for the holiday weeks ahead. Additionally, A24's Lady Bird continued its impressive run in limited release as it makes way for a nationwide debut over Thanksgiving weekend. With an estimated $96 million, Justice League managed to top the weekend, but fell short of the low end of expectations. Despite bringing in $13 million from Thursday previews, which was $2 million more than Wonder Woman hauled in from preview screenings ahead of a $103.2 million debut, Justice League just couldn't crack the century mark, delivering the lowest opening for any of the films in DC's Extended Universe thus far. Opening day audiences gave the
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

Viacom Halts ‘Padmavati’ Release After Religious Uproar

Viacom Halts ‘Padmavati’ Release After Religious Uproar
India’s Viacom18 Motion Pictures and Bhansali Productions have halted the global release of much-anticipated costume drama “Padmavati.” Controversy was sparked by the idea that it features a cross-faith Hindu-Muslim romance.

The film had been set for a Dec. 1 release in India. Related company, Paramount Pictures was recently announced as handle the worldwide distribution, in a day-and-date date release, coordinated with the outing in India.

While announcing a “voluntary deferment” of the film’s release, Viacom18 said that it had faith in legal process. And that it expected to announce a new date soon.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Lady Bird,’ ‘Three Billboards’ Fly High, Netflix Mum on ‘Mudbound’ Results

‘Lady Bird,’ ‘Three Billboards’ Fly High, Netflix Mum on ‘Mudbound’ Results
A24’s “Lady Bird” and Fox Searchlight’s “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” both cracked the top 10 at the domestic box office this weekend as limited release awards contenders.

But Netflix is opting to maintain its policy of not releasing box office numbers after opening its awards candidate “Mudbound” in 17 theaters this weekend. Netflix also began streaming the well-reviewed historical drama on Friday.

A24’s third weekend of comedy-drama “Lady Bird” moved up from 10th to eighth place with $2.5 million at 253 sites as the distributor added 201 locations. A24 plans to further expand the coming-of-age movie, which marks Greta Gerwig’s feature directorial debut, over the Thanksgiving holiday. “Lady Bird,” starring Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalfe, scored $364,437 on four screens for the top limited opening of the year on Nov. 3-5 and has grossed $4.7 million in its first 17 days.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Box Office: ‘Justice League’ Scores $185 Million International Opening, Led by China

Box Office: ‘Justice League’ Scores $185 Million International Opening, Led by China
Warner Bros.-DC’s “Justice League” dominated the international box office in its opening weekend with $185.5 million at approximately 47,000 screens in 65 markets, led by $51.7 million in China.

The costly superhero tentpole is ahead of the international opening weekends for Warner’s “Wonder Woman” and Disney-Marvel’s “Thor: Ragnarok.” In China, where “Justice League” screened at 20,500 screens, the film took in 65% of grosses from the top five films and scored the second biggest debut for a Warners title after last year’s “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.”

Justice League” ranked first in 10 other Asian markets with $41.2 million as the second highest Warner Bros. launch after “Dawn of Justice” while Latin America region contributed $35.4 million for the third highest Warner opening after “Dawn of Justice” and the final Harry Potter movie. Results from Europe topped “Wonder Woman” and were slightly behind “Thor: Ragnarok.”

Brazil was the top individual market after China with $14.2 million on 1,580 screens and set a record
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Studiocanal, Neal Street Climb Enid Blyton’s ‘Magic Faraway Tree’; Simon Farnaby To Pen

Studiocanal and Neal Street Productions are developing a feature adaptation of Enid Blyton's Magic Faraway Tree with Paddington 2‘s Simon Farnaby attached to write. Neal Street’s Pippa Harris and Nicolas Brown will produce. English writer Blyton, who has been called the Jk Rowling of her time, was born in 1897 and is one of the biggest selling children's authors in history with global sales of over 500M books. The Magic Faraway Tree series was written between 1939 and…
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‘Paddington’ Team Takes on Enid Blyton Classic ‘Magic Faraway Tree’

With “Paddington 2” still riding high at the British box office, the team behind the hit movie is developing another children’s classic, “Magic Faraway Tree,” an adventure novel by Enid Blyton.

The project first came to light in 2014 when Sam Mendes and Pippa HarrisNeal Street Productions said they were working on a movie. StudioCanal, the European studio behind the Paddington films, is now on board, and Simon Farnaby, who wrote the new film starring the stuffed bear, is attached to write the Blyton adaptation. It marks the first time the Blyton’s 1943 novel has been taken to the big screen.

Blyton, a prolific author of books read by generations of British schoolchildren, wrote four “Faraway Tree” books. “Magic Faraway Tree” is the second in the series. Each book takes place in the enchanted forest in which the special tree grows; the tree is tall enough to reach the clouds and large enough to contain small houses
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From Ex Machina to Moonlight: how A24 disrupted Hollywood

Can the Us indie distributor become the new Miramax or Weinstein Company?

It is not often that you notice logos at the beginning of movies, but one in particular is becoming unavoidable, especially if you’ve gone to the cinema looking for something a bit edgy and grown-up, but not old-fashioned. If you’re a fan of those sorts of films, then the sliding, retro-minimalist, white-on-black logo of A24 films is probably etched on to your subconscious. You can currently see it before The Killing of a Sacred Deer, The Florida Project and Good Time. And, soon, on The Disaster Artist, James Franco’s buzzed-about tribute to bad-movie titan Tommy Wiseau.

Related: The Florida Project’s Sean Baker: ‘I wanted the kids to be the kings and queens of their domain’

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Idfa: Brazilian Indigenous Peoples Doc ‘Piripkura,’ Awarded Amsterdam Human Rights Award (Watch Trailer)

Brazil’s “Piripkura” has won the Amsterdam Human Rights Award at this year’s International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (Idfa). Recognition for a devastating chronicle, the award comes with a cash prize of €25,000 ($29,000).

The jury said of the film: “With this poignant, exceptional story, the filmmakers tackle a broad series of issues that should be high up on the international human rights agenda. The filmic quality of this documentary left us no choice but to award the Amsterdam Human Rights Award to ‘Piripkura.’”

The film was produced by Brazil’s Zeza Filmes with Maria Farinha Filmes and Grifa Filmes as associate producers.

Zeza Filmes focuses on projects which have a personal human approach. They are currently working on a fiction series titled “Incógnita,” and the documentary film “Meu Querido Supermercado,” with producer Casa Redonda. The later received the Idfa Bertha Fund in 2015.

Farinha Filmes produces and distributes stories meant to raise awareness about social issues which will affect
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Idfa Film Review: ‘Golden Dawn Girls’

Perhaps no few seconds of video — plus the ethical debate that shot up around them — encapsulates 2017 better than the mid-interview shot of American white supremacist Richard Spencer getting punched in the face by a furious protester: a base act of moral retribution that, in a glum year for left-wing politics, many a dispirited liberal has secretly repeat-watched on YouTube as a kind of stress-ball for the eyes. Even such cold comfort is in short supply, however, in “Golden Dawn Girls,” Norwegian docmaker Håvard Bustnes’s troubling, grimly compelling study of the rapid rise of neo-Nazism in contemporary Greece, in which any sense of comeuppance is held strictly in limbo.

With white nationalist politics depressingly ascendant in Europe and America alike, Bustnes’s unabashedly subjective, sometimes despairingly comic doc is sure to strike a chord with festival programmers, distributors and audiences following its Idfa world premiere, despite a few ragged technical edges; the presence of Nick Broomfield as executive
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Idfa: The Bertha Fund At 20 – ‘Bringing In New Voices, Other Stories’

Amsterdam — As Idfa turns 30, its partners at the Bertha Fund are quietly celebrating its 20th, capping this milestone year by taking the festival opening night slot – with Mohamed Siam’s “Amal” – for the first time since 2013’s critical hit “Return To Homs,” by Talal Derki. Committed to supporting documentary filmmaking in developing countries, the fund receives nearly 1,000 submissions a year, of which it can financially support around 30 projects, offering a boost to films from Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Middle East, as well as certain countries in Eastern Europe that are not part of the E.U.

“We operate like a regular fund,” says Isabel Arrate Fernandez, its managing director. “We have selection rounds, and we give grants for development, we give grants for production, which is really just cash.”

Depending on the projects and what they need, Bertha also tries to fit them into either Idfa’s Forum market, or its training
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Idfa Golden Dawn Girls Director Håvard Bustnes, ‘The Far Right Movement Is Marching Again’

Amsterdam — Test screenings are a tricky business at the best of times, but when the subjects of Håvard Bustnes’s documentary sat down to watch their big-screen debut last week, it’s fair to say the exit scores were always going to be in the low numbers. Filmed over four years, the film would, they’d thought, show them as “normal people with families”, but instead it paints a disturbing view of modern-day neo-Nazism, lifting the lid on the controversial Greek nationalist party through the lives of three women whose menfolk make up its central core.

Bustnes soon received word that they were not happy, and security was duly increased for last night’s premiere, which took place at a very fractious point in modern European history, following a large right-wing rally in Poland last week and smaller incidents in Holland recently. With the spectre of Charlottesville still also very much in the news – indeed, a Vice documentary
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Korea Box Office: ‘Justice League’ on Top as Foreign Films Dominate

Korea Box Office:  ‘Justice League’ on Top as Foreign Films Dominate
Opening on Wednesday (Nov. 15), “Justice League” debuted on top of the South Korean box office. The Warner Bros. release earned $8.74 million from 1.14 million admissions over five days.

Happy Death Day” remained in second, earning $2.2 million between Friday and Sunday for a total of $7.62 million after two weekends on release. “Thor: Ragnarok” slipped to third from the previous week’s top spot, with a drop of 65%. The Disney release earned $1.28 million for a total of $33.9 million after four weekends. The three non-Korean films accounted for 74% of the total weekend box office altogether.

Another Wednesday opener, Lotte Entertainment’s “Room No. 7” debuted in fourth place. The comedy drama about a worker who finds a corpse and his boss who tries to sell the venue to cover up the incident, earned a five-day total of $1.92 million. Directed by Lee Yong-seung, “No. 7” was the opening film of this year’s Bucheon fantasy festival.

Korean duo, “The Bros” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Idfa DocLab’s Caspar Sonnen: ‘We Can No Longer Just Blame Technology For Everything’

Idfa DocLab’s Caspar Sonnen: ‘We Can No Longer Just Blame Technology For Everything’
Amsterdam — The most noticeable aspect of this year’s DocLab is that, although it still has a presence, Virtual Reality finally seems to have settled down – turn a corner, go through a corridor of film posters, and there’s a bespoke Vr cinema, with twin seating arrangements to make the process just a little more social. It’s very matter of fact: Vr doesn’t seem to be trying so hard to be noticed this year.

Caspar Sonnen, Idfa’s head of new media, downplays that suggestion, citing instead the finite space at DocLab’s home at the Brakke Grond arts center, but it does seem that the technology once deemed the future of film is, well, no longer so futuristic.

“I think last year was peak Vr,” said Sonnen. “Even though only a third of the projects were Vr, it’s just the thing that everybody sees or looks for –even the people who hate the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Charles Manson: Finally, Death Gets One Right

Charles Manson: Finally, Death Gets One Right
Charles Manson, the sick mind behind a Los Angeles killing spree in 1969 that ended in seven murders including pregnant actress Sharon Tate, has died tonight in a Bakersfield, CA hospital. He was 83. Manson hung around the fringes of show business in the ’60s then created his reign of terror, and has spent the past 46 years in prison. Relatives of Tate were informed tonight by officials from the California State Prison system that Manson had died. Manson “died of natural…
See full article at Deadline »

Charles Manson Dies at 83

Charles Manson Dies at 83
Charles Manson, the notorious leader of the Manson Family cult that murdered actress Sharon Tate and six others in 1969, died Sunday in a Bakersfield, Calif., hospital. He was 83.

The California Department of Corrections released a statement reading, “Inmate Charles Manson, 83, died of natural causes at 8:13 p.m. on Sunday, November 19, 2017, at a Kern County hospital.”

Manson returned to the hospital in mid-November after being hospitalized in January. He was transferred out of Corcoran State Prison, where he had been serving nine life sentences. He had been denied parole 12 times.

The shocking murders brought the carefree hippie era of the late 1960s to a dark end, with Manson and his followers becoming infamous cultural figures. Though he didn’t commit the Tate and Labianca murders himself, the Corrections Department said “On December 13, 1971, Manson received a first-degree murder conviction from Los Angeles County for the July 25, 1969, death of Gary Hinman and another first-degree murder conviction for the August
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Los Perros’, ‘To Let’ win Kolkata Festival

‘Los Perros’, ‘To Let’ win Kolkata Festival
Chilean-French “Los Perros,” directed by Marcela Said, won the best picture prize in the international competition of the 23rd Kolkata International Film Festival. Iceland’s Asa Helga Hjorleifsdottir won best director for “Swan.”

In the Indian competition, Chezhiyan Ra’s “To Let” was awarded best film while Dr. Bijukumar Damodaran won best director for “Sound of Silence.” The jury gave a special mention to Panchakshari’s “Pathumma”.

Akanksha Sood Singh’s “Mrityubhoj – the Death Feast” won best Indian documentary while Amritanshu’s “Chaahat Ke Gubbare” won best Indian short.

Despite inclement weather, the festival was extraordinarily well attended with all screenings, talks and masterclasses witnessing capacity crowds.

This year the focus country was the U.K. and noted British academic Rachel Dwyer delivered the annual Satyajit Ray memorial lecture, named for the late Oscar-winning Kolkata director of seminal films such as “Pather Panchali” and “Days and Nights in the Forest.” Dwyer discussed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Walking Dead’ Review: Negan Finally Explains Himself In ‘The Big Scary U’

‘The Walking Dead’ Review: Negan Finally Explains Himself In ‘The Big Scary U’
Whose Episode Is It?

It’s a Negan episode. Wait, don’t go! It’s actually much better than it sounds! In fact, “The Big Scary U” is not only the best episode of Season 8, it might be better than any episode from Season 7. And it manages this feat by simply giving Negan some depth and motivation, an actual character for us to consider, instead of a one-note psychopath. It also gives poor Jeffrey Dean Morgan something to do other than bluster, and he admirably rises to the occasion.

“The Big Scary U” also goes a long way in confirming that this season will finally seriously address the moral costs of living in the zombie apocalypse, as it both establishes Negan’s philosophy and questions Rick’s methodology. It even manages to address this in different storylines involving multiple characters, which is a rarity for the standard recent “Walking Dead
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Problem with Apu’: Hari Kondabolu Doesn’t Want to Punish ‘The Simpsons,’ but He’s Looking for a Shift in the System

‘The Problem with Apu’: Hari Kondabolu Doesn’t Want to Punish ‘The Simpsons,’ but He’s Looking for a Shift in the System
For a movie meant to start conversations, “The Problem with Apu” follows its own advice and includes plenty of its own. In his search for answers about the origins, impact, and continued inclusion of “The Simpsons” character Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, Hari Kondabolu gives over much of the runtime of his new truTV documentary to his talks with South Asian performers and professionals about how Apu has affected not just their careers, but their lives.

Kondabolu’s film argues that as a character, Apu isn’t just a vehicle for promoting misguided and harmful stereotypes about South Asian people. For him, it’s a symptom of a system that never had anyone at the table to explain why the Kwik-e-Mart owner might be a caricature that would fundamentally shape understanding of the South Asian-American experience for everyone from playground bullies to well-intentioned businessmen.

This need for an honest evaluation of what Apu might represent,
See full article at Indiewire »

Idfa Film Review: ‘Amal’

For most young adults, coming of age feels like a fight against stasis. As your body, emotions and perspective rapidly change from month to month, the world often feels too still and too staid to support your new, unruly self-in-progress. For the eponymous subject of Mohamed Siam’s tight, perceptive documentary “Amal,” however, the dynamic is rather different and more disorienting: As her adolescence is irrevocably shaped by the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, her personal growth and her country’s violent upheaval complement each other in their turbulence.

Checking in annually on Amal’s unpredictable progress over five tough years, Siam’s bittersweet film elegantly maintains its dual personal and political narrative without undue contrivance. The engrossing, quietly upsetting result should travel widely — as befits its multinational provenance — on the festival circuit following its prominent premiere as this year’s Idfa opener. Meanwhile, the multi-platform distribution appeal of a film that touches intersectionally on topical matters of gender
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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